Transport Canberra and City Services


Lone Pine

Origins

Lone Pine (WMV 10.1MB)

Lone Pine or Plateau 400 was the scene of a major diversionary offensive launched by the 1st Australian Infantry Division on 6 August 1915. The Turks had cut down all but one of the trees that clothed the ridge to cover their trenches. The ridge dominated by the single Allepo Pine (Pinus halepensis) became known as Lone Pine. In three days of fighting the Australians lost more than 2000 men and the Turks losses were estimated at 7000. Seven Victoria Crosses were awarded.

As far as we know two Australian soldiers souvenired pinecones from the ridge that found their way back to Australia.

Lance Corporal Benjamin Smith of the 3rd Battalion, whose brother was killed in the battle for Lone Pine Ridge, sent a cone home to his mother, Mrs McMullen at Inverell in New South Wales. Mrs McMullen kept the cone for 13 years before planting the seeds in 1928. She grew two seedlings, one of which she presented to the town of Inverell and the other to the Parks and Gardens section of the Department of the Interior in Canberra. The Duke of Gloucester planted this second tree at the Australian War Memorial in October 1934. Today it stands over 20 metres in height.

SGT Keith McDowell of the 24th Battalion carried a pinecone in his haversack until the end of the war. Upon returning home to Australia he gave it to his aunt, Mrs Emma Gray, who lived at Grassmere near Warrnambool, Victoria. A decade or so later Mrs Gray planted the seeds and four seedlings were grown. One was planted in May 1933 in Wattle Park, Melbourne. Another at the Shrine of Remembrance in Melbourne and another at the Soldiers Memorial Hall at The Sisters. The last was planted in the Warrnambool Gardens.

Recent distribution

In 1990 two trees were taken back to Gallipoli with war veterans who attended the memorial service to mark the 75th anniversary of the battle of Lone Pine.

Since the 1980s many trees have been grown by both seed and grafting techniques from material collected from the tree at the Australian War Memorial. These have been disseminated to many organisations including RSL branches and clubs, schools and other interested organisations.

Availability

Yarralumla Nursery now propagates a number of trees from seed collected from the tree at the Australian War Memorial. These are generally available throughout the year and can be purchased at the Yarralumla Nursery.

All enquiries regarding the purchase of Lone Pine seedlings should be directed to the Nursery preferable by email to Yarr.nursery@act.gov.au or by phone on 6207 2446.

The sale price for the Lone Pine is as follows:

SizeGST Exclusive PriceGST Inclusive Price
Forestry tube$18.18$20
140 mm$45.45$50
200 mm$90.91$100
300 mm$181.82$200

The postage of Forestry Tubes only will be organised by the Yarralumla Nursery.

It will be the customers responsibility to organise collection of plants from 140 mm and above at their own cost.

Postage and handling of Forestry Tubes is to be charged in addition to the plant cost as follows:

NumberGST Exclusive PriceGST Inclusive Price
1$16.36$18
2$22.73$25
3$27.27$30
4$27.27$30

Please note this may change depending on the area and postage requirements.

Postage & handling to be billed to FREPUR item code.  

Plants will only be dispatched on a Monday weekly. Customers who organise the collection of plants 140mm and above are asked to arrange collection on Mondays only.

You can view more information about The Lone Pine in The Lone Pine information sheet (PDF 288KB).


Contact Details for Yarralumla Nursery

Regular Opening Hours

Monday to Friday:
7.30 am to 4 pm

Saturday/Sunday/public holidays:
Closed

Address

Banks Street
Yarralumla ACT 2600

Contact Numbers

Phone: 02 6207 2447

Email: yarr.nursery@act.gov.au

The ACT Government is committed to improving the accessibility of web content. To provide feedback or request an accessible version of a document please contact us or phone 13 22 81.

We acknowledge the Traditional Custodians of the ACT, the Ngunnawal people. We acknowledge and respect their continuing culture and the contribution they make to the life of this city and this region.

Bookmark and Share

Feedback | Languages | Sitemap | Jobs ACT | Privacy | Disclaimer | Copyright Page last updated on 09 October 2019