Transport Canberra and City Services


Movable signs

City Rangers enforce the Code of Practice for Movable Signs and advise on the placement of signs. The Code of Practice is established by the Public Unleased Land Act 2013 and applies to movable signs including but not restricted to business signs, real estate signs, community signs and electoral advertising signs. A brochure outlining the Public Unleased Land (Movable Signs) Code of Practice is available here (Word 112KB) (PDF 725KB).

It is an offence to, without reasonable excuse, place or keep a movable sign in a public place other than in accordance with this Code of Practice.

Insurance requirements

A person who places a movable sign in a public place must have a current public liability insurance policy for at least $10,000,000 limit of liability, which would include any liability to the public or the Territory arising out of such a sign, its design, construction or placement.

Number of movable signs and time limits

  1. Business signs - Each Business may display a maximum of two (2) movable signs whilst the business is open for trading. Business signs must be kept within the boundaries of the commercial or industrial trading area in which the business is operating.
  2. Real estate signs - Direction signs indicating open home or display home exhibitions may only be displayed during the hours the exhibition is open for viewing.
  3. Community signs - Schools, community groups and registered charities may display a maximum of twenty (20) movable signs for a period of two (2) weeks prior to the advertised event.
  4. Electoral advertising signs - Electoral advertising signs may be displayed for a period for up to six (6) weeks.

For more information refer to the Electoral Advertising Factsheet (Word 66KB) (PDF 316KB) .

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We acknowledge the Traditional Custodians of the ACT, the Ngunnawal people. We acknowledge and respect their continuing culture and the contribution they make to the life of this city and this region.

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